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The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In: Saturday, November 5th 9:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific

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Compensatory Call InThe Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how best to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. We’ll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. We’ll examine news reports from the past seven days and – hopefully – promote a constructive dialog.
#ANTIBLACKNESS

Whites celebrated Halloween 2016 in style. A White NCAA football spectator brandished an effigy of President Obama being lynched – he was allowed to remain at the ball game. A University of Arkansas student dawned blackface to dressed up as Bill Cosby – he was later expelled. Speaking of ghouls and tricks, the 2016 presidential election nears a merciful conclusion. The trend of black people being misused and mauled throughout the campaign continued as a Mississippi black church was vandalized; “Vote Trump” was spray painted on the side of the sanctuary. White terrorists didn’t confine their barbarism to black places of worship, as two Iowa police officers were reportedly shot and killed by a White man. Scott Michael Greene was “detained without incident;” Law enforcement apparently didn’t feel threatened or concerned for their safety even though Greene had a history of conflict with police – including being ejected from a high school football game for brandishing a confederate flag and haranguing black spectators.

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The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p

Views – 215

medical apartheid: Jahi McMath, Black Girl Left Brain Dead From Routine Tonsillectomy, To Be Kept On Life Support

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Nailah Winkfield, mother of 13-year-old Jahi McMath, cries before a courtroom hearing regarding McMath, Friday, Dec. 20, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. | ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A 13-year-old California girl declared brain dead after complications from a tonsillectomy should be kept on life support for the time being, a judge has ruled.

The family of Jahi McMath says doctors at Children’s Hospital Oakland wanted to disconnect life support after Jahi was declared brain dead on Dec. 12.

Friday’s ruling by Superior Court Judge Evelio Grillo came as both sides in the case agreed to get together and chose a neurologist to further examine Jahi and determine her condition. The judge scheduled a hearing Monday to appoint a physician.

The girl’s family sought the court order to keep Jahi on a ventilator. They left the courtroom without commenting.

After her daughter underwent a supposedly routine tonsillectomy and was moved to a recovery room, Nailah Winkfield began to fear something was going horribly wrong.

Jahi was sitting up in bed, her hospital gown bloody, and holding a pink cup full of blood.

“Is this normal?” Winkfield repeatedly asked nurses.

With her family and hospital staff trying to help and comfort her, Jahi kept bleeding profusely for the next few hours then went into cardiac arrest, her mother said.

Despite the family’s description of the surgery as routine, the hospital said in a memorandum presented to the court Friday that the procedure was a “complicated” one.

“Ms. McMath is dead and cannot be brought back to life,” the hospital said in the memo, adding: “Children’s is under no legal obligation to provide medical or other intervention for a deceased person.”

In an interview at Children’s Hospital Oakland on Thursday night, Winkfield described the nightmarish turn of events after her daughter underwent tonsil removal surgery to help with her sleep apnea.

She said that even before the surgery, her daughter had expressed fears that she wouldn’t wake up after the operation. To everyone’s relief, she appeared alert, was talking and even ate a Popsicle afterward.

But about a half-hour later, shortly after the girl was taken to the intensive care unit, she began bleeding from her mouth and nose despite efforts by hospital staff and her family.

While the bleeding continued, Jahi wrote her mother notes. In one, the girl asked to have her nose wiped because she felt it running. Her mother said she didn’t want to scare her daughter by saying it was blood.

Family members said there were containers of Jahi’s blood in the room, and hospital staff members were providing transfusions to counteract the blood loss.

“I don’t know what a tonsillectomy is supposed to look like after you have it, but that blood was un-normal for anything,” Winkfield said.

The family said hospital officials told them in a meeting Thursday that they want to take the girl off life support quickly.

“I just looked at the doctor to his face and I told him you better not touch her,” Winkfield recalled.

Despite the family’s description of the surgery as routine, the hospital said in a memorandum presented to the court Friday that the procedure was a “complicated” one.

“Ms. McMath is dead and cannot be brought back to life,” the hospital said in the memo, adding: “Children’s is under no legal obligation to provide medical or other intervention for a deceased person.”

The family filed a request Friday for a temporary restraining order prohibiting the hospital from taking Jahi off life support or any of her other current treatment.

At the hearing later, the hospital’s attorney, Doug Straus, said two doctors unaffiliated with the hospital examined Jahi and concluded that she was brain dead. But he said, “We’re happy to cooperate with the judge’s suggestion that an independent expert be provided to confirm yet again that brain death is the outcome that has occurred here.”

The family’s attorney, Christopher Dolan, said the family wanted independent tests of their own because they do not believe the hospital’s physicians are sufficiently independent.

“There is mistrust and there is a conflict of interest,” he said.

Judge Grillo said he would grant the restraining order in hopes that a resolution could be reached by Christmas to give the family peace of mind.

Hospitals do a barrage of sophisticated tests to determine brain death, said Dr. Cristobal Barrios, an associate professor and a trauma and critical care surgeon at the University of California, Irvine. He is not involved in Jahi’s care and spoke about general hospital protocols.

The tests include touching a patient’s cornea to elicit a blink, moving a breathing tube to stimulate a gag reflex, tickling the back of the throat to bring on a cough, and applying pressure or pain.

If the patient fails to respond to all of those tests, doctors remove the breathing tube for a few minutes. If there is any brain activity, the patient should begin breathing within a few minutes, he said.

In some cases, doctors will also draw a blood sample, add radioactive tags and re-inject it into the body to track where it flows. If the blood doesn’t flow to the brain, Barrios said, there is no brain activity.

Generally, two teams of specialists must run the tests and determine independently that the patient is brain dead, he said. At UC Irvine, those evaluations must take place 12 hours apart if the patient is a child.

Barrios said it’s not unusual for family members to resist a diagnosis of brain death.

While the hospital is not obligated to keep life support going after that diagnosis, Barrios has left brain dead patients hooked up for up to five days while family members move toward acceptance, he said.

“I understand why sometimes for families it’s devastating and confusing,” he said.

___

Associated Press writer Gillian Flaccus in Santa Ana contributed to this report.

Jahi McMath, Girl Left Brain Dead From Routine Tonsillectomy, To Be Kept On Life Support.

Views – 278

When Prisons Retaliate: California Inmates Still Paying Price for Demanding Rights | Black Agenda Report

by Sarah Lazare

California prison inmates have held three hunger strikes and mass work stoppages in the last two years, protesting appalling conditions and the torture of solitary confinement. The state is striking back. “We’ve received letters around individual guards or groups of guards targeting people who participated in the strike.” As many as 30,000 inmates may face some form of retaliation.

When Prisons Retaliate: California Inmates Still Paying Price for Demanding Rights

by Sarah Lazare

This article originally appeared in Common Dreams.

We demand an end to retaliation, and those demands are entwined with continued political organizing work to change the system.”

Four months after California prisoners declared a hunger strike to protest solitary confinement and other abuse, they are still suffering retaliatory punishment at the hands of corrections authorities, thePrisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition announced Monday.

“We demand an end to retaliation, and those demands are entwined with continued political organizing work to change the system,” said Isaac Ontiveros, with the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition and Critical Resistance, in an interview with Common Dreams. “It is the minimum of human decency to not retaliate against people who participated in the peaceful protest.”

Prisoners who participated in the California-wide prisoner hunger strike, launched July eighth, have been slammed with what are called a “115 write-ups.” The penalty accuses the prisoners “of committing a serious rule violation” for participation in the hunger strike, according to a statement from the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition.

The write-ups have serious consequences for inmates who can face years-long extensions of their solitary confinement and denial of parole as a result. “It is something that goes into your record, so that when you are reviewed for whatever reason around parole, moving from one place to another, it affects the nature of your imprisonment,” Ontiveros explains.

“People perceived as supporting the strike, whether refusing meals, refusing work, or supporting the strike with other action faced retaliation,” said attorney Caitlin Kelly-Henry in an interview withCommon Dreams. “As many as 30,000 people are documented as refusing meals at the time the strike was declared. We don’t have numbers of people who refused work. It could be as many as hundreds or thousands of people who faced 115 and other write-ups.”

The write-ups have serious consequences for inmates.”

The 115 write-ups are part of broad retaliatory measures inflicted against prisoners who participated in the hunger strike, including searching cells, obstructing inmates’ communications with the outside world—including lawyers—punishing strikers with more severe solitary confinement, and intimidating inmates to prevent them from appealing the harsh measures. Prisons were also given the green light toforce-feed hunger striking prisoners—a move that human rights advocates slammed as a gross violation of human rights.

Much retaliation is informal, in an environment where prison guards hold staggering power over the lives of inmates. “We’ve received letters around individual guards or groups of guards targeting people who participated in the strike,” explains Ontiveros. “This is highly racialized, with high incidence of targeting of black prisoners who participated in the strike.”

In a legislative hearing last month with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation—won by the prisoner hunger strikes and outside support—prison authorities admitted they retaliated against inmates who participated in the hunger strikes, says Ontiveros.

Supporters of the inmates are demanding that Michael Stainer, Director of the Division of Adult Institutions at CDCR, use his authority to immediately reverse the retaliatory measure.

Stainer’s office did not immediately respond to repeated requests from Common Dreams for an interview.

Ontiveros says that as supporters on the outside demand an end for retaliation, and push for legislative hearings, they also work to “end the CDCR’s repression that leads to solitary confinement.

“This is an important moment to act in very strong solidarity,” he added.

Sarah Lazare is a staff writer for Common Dreams.

When Prisons Retaliate: California Inmates Still Paying Price for Demanding Rights | Black Agenda Report.

Views – 128