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The C.O.W.S. Compensatory Call-In: Saturday, November 5th 9:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific

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Compensatory Call InThe Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how best to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. We’ll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. We’ll examine news reports from the past seven days and – hopefully – promote a constructive dialog.
#ANTIBLACKNESS

Whites celebrated Halloween 2016 in style. A White NCAA football spectator brandished an effigy of President Obama being lynched – he was allowed to remain at the ball game. A University of Arkansas student dawned blackface to dressed up as Bill Cosby – he was later expelled. Speaking of ghouls and tricks, the 2016 presidential election nears a merciful conclusion. The trend of black people being misused and mauled throughout the campaign continued as a Mississippi black church was vandalized; “Vote Trump” was spray painted on the side of the sanctuary. White terrorists didn’t confine their barbarism to black places of worship, as two Iowa police officers were reportedly shot and killed by a White man. Scott Michael Greene was “detained without incident;” Law enforcement apparently didn’t feel threatened or concerned for their safety even though Greene had a history of conflict with police – including being ejected from a high school football game for brandishing a confederate flag and haranguing black spectators.

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CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE 564943#

#AnswersForMiriamCarey

The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p

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The COWS Compensatory Call-In: Saturday, July 9th 9:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific

Saturday, July 9th 9:00PM Eastern/ 6:00PM Pacific

The Context of White Supremacy hosts the weekly Compensatory Call-In. We encourage non-white listeners to dial in with their codified concepts, new terms, observations, research findings, workplace problems or triumphs, and/or suggestions on how eeest to Replace White Supremacy With Justice ASAP. We’ll use these sessions to hone our use of words as tools to reveal truth, neutralize White people. We’ll examine news reports from the past seven days and – hopefully – promote a constructive dialog.
#ANTIBLACKNESS

The 4th of July fireworks were barely extinguished before business as usual resumed in the United States. As White Supremacists never take a vacation from brutalizing black people, Louisiana’s Alton Sterling and Minnesota’s Philander Castile were gunned down on camera by Race Soldiers. No one has been charged for their respective deaths; social media cranked out fresh hashtags and rhetoric about justice. Much of this was scuttled when a Thursday evening Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas, Texas was interrupted bysniper fire. It was originally reported that multiple shooters fired into the crowd killing five police officers and wounding eleven others – including two civilians. Updated reports indicate that investigators believe Micah Xavier Johnson, a 25-year-old black male, is the sole shooter; officers allegedly killed him with an incendiary device after an extensive shootout. However, alternate reports indicate Johnson died from a self-inflicted gun wound. With so many questions unanswered, many have concluded that President Obama and Black Lives Matter protesters are the culpabale for the mythological “war on cops.” It’s being alleged that Johnson was “upset with White people,” which motivated his calculated attack. Much like the 1963 assassination of John F. Kennedy – which was also in Dallas, this shooting will greatly impact who resides in the White House. Then again, maybe the weekend opening of The Purge had a bigger impact than we think.
#AnswersForMiriamCarey

INVEST in The COWS – paypal.me/GusTRenegade

CALL IN NUMBER: 641.715.3640 CODE 564943#

The C.O.W.S. archives: http://tiny.cc/76f6p

Replace Racism/White Supremacy With Justice (RWSWJ). The Context of White Supremacy (COWS) Radio Program is specifically engineered for non-white people, Victims of Racism. The purpose of this program is to share constructive information and suggestions to aid non-white people in dealing with and countering Racism/White Supremacy. And… Compensatory Sex Pledge: Under the System of White Supremacy, I do not condone, suggest or participate in sexual intercourse between White people and non-whites/Victims of Racism.

Source: The COWS Compensatory Call-In 07/09/16

Views – 172

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8 Shocking Facts From the ACLU’z Report on Life Without Parole | Moorbey’z Blog

Inmates are escorted by a guard through San Quentin state prison in San Quentin, Calif., on June 8, 2012.

Lucy Nicholson / REUTERS

Inmates are escorted by a guard through San  Quentin state prison in San Quentin, Calif., on June 8,  2012.

A sentence of life in prison without the possibility parole seems like it  would be a punishment reserved only for the most heinous criminals, those deemed  unfit for reintroduction into society. That’s not always the case, according to  a new report from the American Civil Liberties Union, which advocates for more  lenient sentencing.

The cases documented in A Living Death are not necessarily typical, and  many are the result of mandatory minimum sentencing laws, not the  discretion of a judge or jury. But some of the stories of the 3,278  people the ACLU counts serving life without parole in federal prisons and the  nine states that provided them with data are nonetheless shocking.

The number of U.S. prisoners who received life sentences  without parole quadrupled between 1992 and 2012.

More than 18 percent of nonviolent offenders serving life  without parole in the federal system are in for their first offense.

Lance Saltzman, of Florida, removed a gun from his home that  belonged to an abusive stepfather who had used the weapon to threaten his mother  repeatedly, he said. He was convicted of armed burglary and, due to a previous  burglary conviction when he was 16, sentenced to mandatory life without  parole.

In the state of Illinois, a black person is 33.25 times more  likely than a white person to be sentenced to life without parole for a  non-violent crime.

Clarence Aaron, a college student with no prior criminal  record, was given three life-without-parole sentences for his minor role in two  planned large drug deals, one of which never took place. He received longer  sentences than his co-conspirators and has spent the past 20 years in  prison.

Black prisoners comprise 91.4 percent of the non-violent  life-without-parole population in the state of Louisiana.

Vincent Winslow was homeless when he acted as a  go-between in the sale of two $10 bags of marijuana to an undercover cop. The  seller was not arrested. Based on decade old drug possession conviction and  unarmed burglaries committed 14 and 24 years earlier, Winslow was sentenced to  life without parole.

The crimes for which people have been sentenced to life  without parole (when combined with prior convictions) include stealing: small  change from a parked car, a pair of socks, nine children’s videotapes, a pair of  work gloves from a department store, a leaf blower, three golf clubs, chocolate  chip cookies and a slice of pizza.

Read the full report here.

8 Shocking Facts From the ACLU’z Report on Life Without Parole | Moorbey’z Blog.

 

Views – 120

TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE by Solomon Northup – FULL Audio Book | Greatest Audio Books 12 – YouTube

TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE by Solomon Northup – FULL Audio Book | Greatest Audio Books – Twelve Years a Slave (1853; sub-title: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New-York, kidnapped in Washington city in 1841, and rescued in 1853, from a cotton plantation near the Red River in Louisiana), by Solomon Northup as told to David Wilson, is a memoir of a black man who was born free in New York state but kidnapped, sold into slavery and kept in bondage for 12 years in Louisiana before the American Civil War. He provided details of slave markets in Washington, DC, as well as describing at length cotton cultivation on major plantations in Louisiana.

Published soon after Harriet Beecher Stowe‘s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Northup’s book sold 30,000 copies and was considered a bestseller. It went through several editions in the nineteenth century. Supporting Stowe’s fictional narrative in detail, Northup’s first-hand account of his twelve years of bondage proved another bombshell in the national political debate over slavery leading up to the Civil War, drawing endorsements from major Northern newspapers, anti-slavery organizations, and evangelical groups. After several editions in the 19th Century, the book fell into obscurity for nearly 100 years, until it was re-published in 1968 by historian Dr. Sue Eakin. (Summary from Wikipedia.org)
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Chapter listing and length:

01 – Chapter 1 — 00:16:27

02 – Chapter 2 — 00:17:59

03 – Chapter 3 — 00:22:41

04 – Chapter 4 — 00:16:53

05 – Chapter 5 — 00:20:19

06 – Chapter 6 — 00:17:27

07 – Chapter 7 — 00:23:59

08 – Chapter 8 — 00:18:37

09 – Chapter 9 — 00:19:46

10 – Chapter 10 — 00:23:06

11 – Chapter 11 — 00:24:08

12 – Chapter 12 — 00:21:31

13 – Chapter 13 — 00:23:50

14 – Chapter 14 — 00:25:49

15 – Chapter 15 — 00:22:23

16 – Chapter 16 — 00:19:41

17 – Chapter 17 — 00:20:12

18 – Chapter 18 — 00:18:19

19 – Chapter 19 — 00:23:11

20 – Chapter 20 — 00:13:52

21 – Chapter 21 — 00:30:59

22 – Chapter 22 — 00:18:34

23 – Appendix — 00:25:00

“Twelve years a slave. Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New York, kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and rescued in 1853, from a cotton plantation near the Red River, in Louisiana”
Total running time: 8:04:43
Read by Rob Board
In addition to the reader, this audio book was produced by:
Dedicated Proof-Listener: Sarah Engracia Parshall
Meta-Coordinator/Cataloging: Carolin Kaiser
This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved.

TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE by Solomon Northup – FULL Audio Book | Greatest Audio Books 12 – YouTube.

Views – 120

Plantations, Prisons and Profits: Louisiana is the prison capital of the WORLD

Louisiana is the world’s prison capital. The state imprisons more of its people, per head, than any of its U.S. counterparts. First among Americans means first in the world. Louisiana’s incarceration rate is nearly triple Iran’s, seven times China’s and 10 times Germany’s.”

That paragraph opens a devastating eight-part series published this month by The Times-Picayune of New Orleans about how the state’s largely private prison system profits from high incarceration rates and tough sentencing, and how many with the power to curtail the system actually have a financial incentive to perpetuate it.

The picture that emerges is one of convicts as chattel and a legal system essentially based on human commodification.

First, some facts from the series:

• One in 86 Louisiana adults is in the prison system, which is nearly double the national average.

More than 50 percent of Louisiana’s inmates are in local prisons, which is more than any other state. The next highest state is Kentucky at 33 percent. The national average is 5 percent.

• Louisiana leads the nation in the percentage of its prisoners serving life without parole.

• Louisiana spends less on local inmates than any other state.

• Nearly two-thirds of Louisiana’s prisoners are nonviolent offenders. The national average is less than half.

In the early 1990s, the state was under a federal court order to reduce overcrowding, but instead of releasing prisoners or loosening sentencing guidelines, the state incentivized the building of private prisons. But, in what the newspaper called “a uniquely Louisiana twist,” most of the prison entrepreneurs were actually rural sheriffs. They saw a way to make a profit and did.

It also was a chance to employ local people, especially failed farmers forced into bankruptcy court by a severe drop in the crop prices.

But in order for the local prisons to remain profitable, the beds, which one prison operator in the series distastefully refers to as “honey holes,” must remain full. That means that on almost a daily basis, local prison officials are on the phones bartering for prisoners with overcrowded jails in the big cities.

It also means that criminal sentences must remain stiff, which the sheriff’s association has supported. This has meant that Louisiana has some of the stiffest sentencing guidelines in the country. Writing bad checks in Louisiana can earn you up to 10 years in prison. In California, by comparison, jail time would be no more than a year.

There is another problem with this unsavory system: prisoners who wind up in these local for-profit jails, where many of the inmates are short-timers, get fewer rehabilitative services than those in state institutions, where many of the prisoners are lifers. That is because the per-diem per prisoner in local prisons is half that of state prisons.

In short, the system is completely backward.

Lifers at state prisons can learn to be welders, plumbers or auto mechanics — trades many will never practice as free men — while prisoners housed in local prisons, and are certain to be released, gain no skills and leave jail with nothing more than “$10 and a bus ticket.”

These ex-convicts, with almost no rehabilitation and little prospect for supporting themselves, return to the already-struggling communities that were rendered that way in part because so many men are being extracted on such a massive scale. There the cycle of crime often begins again, with innocent people caught in the middle and impressionable young eyes looking on.

According to The Times-Picayune: “In five years, about half of the state’s ex-convicts end up behind bars again.”

This suits the prison operators just fine. They need them to come back to the “honey holes.”

Furthermore, the more money the state spends on incarceration, the less it can spend on preventive measures like education. (According to Education Week’s State Report Cards, Louisiana was one of three states and the District of Columbia to receive an F for K-12 achievement in 2012, and, this year, the state, over all, is facing a $220 million deficit in its $25 billion budget.)

Louisiana is the starkest, most glaring example of how our prison policies have failed. It showcases how private prisons do not serve the public interest and how the mass incarceration as a form of job creation is an abomination of justice and civility and creates a long-term crisis by trying to create a short-term solution.

As the paper put it: “A prison system that leased its convicts as plantation labor in the 1800s has come full circle and is again a nexus for profit.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/26/opinion/blow-plantations-prisons-and-profits.html?_r=2

Views – 75